Tuesday, December 23, 2008

sayanora..

Folks:

 The grades have been submitted, and I assume several of you already know yours.

Judging from a sampling of mails prior to the grades, it is possible that several of you
received better grades than you suspected. This is all part of a carefully cultivated delusion
on my part that this  class is somehow harder than your other classes and should have
more christmasey grades.. :-> 

If you did get a grade better than you suspected, just remember the climactic scene from Saving Private Ryan
and just     "... earn it" (which could, for example, involve listening to the final exam answers audio so you don't
carry misunderstandings forward).

 I also wanted to take this opportunity to publicly thank Garrett--your long suffering TA. He had to grade
three projects, four long homeworks and see a demo, and voluntarily held additional office hours over weekends
to help you with your projects.

 I wish you all great holidays and hope  our paths will cross again in future (and that we won't glare at each other, if they do ;-)

 I myself am off to Hawaii where I expect to catch golf balls for my buddy Barack.

cheers
Rao

Monday, December 22, 2008

Final exam answers

As you wait to see your grades, I thought this is pretty much the last chance I have to get you to hear the answers for the final exam

Here it is in audio form (imagine--you can put it on your ipod and hear it instead of those cloying christmas songs...), and just 31min long.

http://rakaposhi.eas.asu.edu/cse494/notes/cse494-final-exam-answers-podcast.WAV

Seriously, if you got a low score on the final, then you probably want to listen to this so you won't carry the misunderstandings with you.

cheers
Rao



Cumulatives with late penalties and participation

Folks:

 There were a bunch of cases of late submissions for which we had forgotten to include the late submission penalty. The version below includes that. Also, the total+P column is total that includes participation credit.

regards
Rao

Emacs!

Project 3

If anyone wants to stop by to pickup project 3, I am here in the lab now (557AD).

Garrett


Final Cumulatives (sans extra credit)--

Folks:

 Here are the final "real" cumulatives (with the final exam marks thrown in). These are computed
with 40% for projects, 20% for homeworks and 40% for exams. [The participation credit is a subjective credit
given out of 5 points. It is not currently added into the cumulatives]

*****I am willing to hear from the students at the top of each list (598 and 471) as to what should be the grade cutoffs
for the rest of the class (these two students are guaranteed an A at least).**** (Those two can send me email with their suggestions)

cheers
Rao


Emacs!

final exam points

Here are the stats on the final exam that I just finished grading.

Emacs!

Saturday, December 20, 2008

Project 3

If anyone needs their project 3, please send me an mail…

 

 

Garrett

 

 

Cumulatives (sans the final exam grade)

Folks:

 Here are the current cumulatives (I am still grading the final--so those are not included). If you find any errors, please let me and garrett know ASAP.

rao
Emacs!

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Blowing Steam Topic: Questions on the final that may have infuriated you etc.

Folks

 Here is a last topic for the blog where you are encouraged to discuss any questions on the final that you found insulting/infuriating/intriguing -- or just want to know what is supposed to be the right answer.

cheers
Rao

Attendance statistics...



According to the participation survey,

 Avg # classes missed: 1.3   (average missed with prior notification: 0.3) Standard Dev: 1.4
Max: 6       Min: 0  [11 students had perfect attendance; so surprisingly, did Rao!]


rao



Monday, December 15, 2008

Re: Semantics and schemas

Not an easy question to answer via email, but I will try..

All I meant when I said databases and/or XML don't have semantics is that the columns don't have any meaning that you might associated based on their "english" names.

Databases do have semantics--they have basically "look-up" semantics. Each tuple describes a complete world and you can do
selection/projection/join/count etc inference (queries). However, just because the database tuple says the person is "dead", you can't assume that the database can answer a query "is the person currently reading a paper?".

The more background knowledge you provide, the more deeper (i.e., non-lookup) inferences you can do. [A set of RDF triples provide no more inferential power than a set of relational tables conforming to a single schema. For example, a database tuple
<id=345, grade=A, gender=male> corresponds to the RDF triples t1--id--345; t1--grade--A; t1--gender--male.
It is the background knowledge--via RDF-Schema--that allows you to  do more inferences.]

--look at it another way. If you remember the magellan story-- after hearing that magellan is an explorer and he went around the world three times, a look-up inference can answer "Is magellan an explorer?" and "how many trips did he make?". A look-up inference however cannot answer the query "in which trip did magellan die?"--that requires more background knowledge. [Of course, if you are happy with just look-up inferences, then you don't need background knowledge. However, when you have multiple autonomous databases, and you wan't to "integrate" then, you in essense at least need a special type of background knowledge that at least maps the columns in both databases]

 if you want a really clean grasp of what it means to talk about inference and semantics, I would recommend that you take intro to AI ( http://rakaposhi.eas.asu.edu/cse471 )

Rao




On Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 10:42 PM, Pierre Bucher <Pierre.Bucher@asu.edu> wrote:
Dear Mr Kambhampati,

The answers to the question you put on the blog some time ago, about whether relational DB had semantics, made me doubt about the meaning of "semantics". I guess that XML Schema don't have semantics, because (1) we would not need RDF if it was the case (2) there is no concept of property and of inheritance in XML Schema, which seems to be the base of semantics. Then I would guess that relational DB don't have semantics either: they just have meta-data without meaning like XML and XML Schema. Is it true?

Moreover, is the fact that we have properties and relationships that gives RDF semantics? Then the concept of inheritance made possible by RDF Schema  would not give semantics, but just makes easier the processing of semantics (and actually we could do little without it). Is that right too?


Thank you.

Pierre Bucher.



Re: One question about Authority/Hub computation

By  "different", I assume you referring to them having different results during  intermediate iterations, right?
We are not really interested in a1 and h1--but rather in a* and h*. Both reach the same fix point. [I suspect the rate of convergence for the first method is going to be faster--for the same reason asynchronous iterations on pagerank make it converge faster.]

rao



On Sun, Dec 14, 2008 at 5:05 PM, Jianhui Chen <Jianhui.Chen@asu.edu> wrote:
Hello, Dear Dr. Rao,

I have a question about the computation of Authority / Hub score as below:
-----------------------------------------------
If a0 and h0 are pre-given, let A be the adjacent matrix, we can
compute a1 and h1 via
following two approaches theoretically

1. a1 = A' * h0, h1 = A * a1
2. a1 = (A' * A) * a0, h1 = (A * A') * h0.

However, in generally, the two approaches would generate different result.

Could you please help to advice which one we should take for the computation?

Sorry for disturbing you during the weekend. Many thanks.

Jianhui

Re: Regarding the discussion

Basically yes..

What is interesting is that you need to have a pretty strong bias to begin with if you are learning only from positive examples if you want to avoid over-generalizing..

Consider, for example, that your most general grammar hypothesis allows both languages that constraint word order (e.g. english) as well as those that don't  (e.g. hindi," spanish -- where you can, in essense say "Tom Mary hit"--while in english you have to say "tom hit mary" or "mary hit tom".) If I only give you positive examples of usage in English, you would not know that English doesn't allow sentences like "Tom mary hit". In order to do do that, you will need to bias your
learner saying that word order dependence and word order independence are mutually exclusive (so you won't over generalize).

Of course, this is not just idle speculation---our current understanding is that children come into this world with a universal grammar which has all these kinds of constraints embedded, so they are able to learn grammar from mostly positive examples.

Rao


On Mon, Dec 15, 2008 at 4:13 PM, Shruti Gaur <sgaur2@asu.edu> wrote:
Dr.Rao,
From the version space idea you explained, it seems the more positive examples we have, the more we can generalize (whereas the negative examples will break the current hypothesis we hold into the next level where we can evaluate each of them and remove the false ones.) which I guess is true in human learning as well.
This made the idea of generating grammar from positive examples more clear as grammar is also kind of a generalization of all the syntactically valid sentences we can make.eg (subject verb object) is the grammar or generalization where each constituent can have different values.

Please correct me if I am wrong
Regards
Shruti

--
Thanks & Regards

Shruti Gaur
Graduate Student
MS(Computer Science)
Dept of Computer Science & Engineering
Arizona State University

Homework 4

If you would like to pickup your graded homework 4 before the final exam, please stop by the lab on the 5th floor.  557AD


Garrett

REMINDER: Exam tomorrow Tuesday 12/16 12:10--2:00pm same room


availability today for final-exam-related questions..

I will be  mostly in my office until about 3pm today. If you have questions, feel free to drop by.

(if you want to check before showing up, my office number is 480 965 0113)

rao

The final exam will be closed-book (as had been agreed in the class)

Some of you sent mails asking whether the final will be open or closed book.

As had been agreed in the class a couple of weeks back, the final will be closed book. You just bring your
brains to the exam (fill them up first though..)

You can use standard (non-matrix) calculators during the exam.

cheers
Rao

Thursday, December 11, 2008

Final exam coverage..


The final exam is going to be comprehensive, but with significantly higher emphasis on the
topics not covered by the midterm.



regards
Rao

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

in praise of intellectual swagger..

Folks:

Just got done going through all your comments on the top-k ideas you appreciated. Thanks for the many thoughtful
comments.

I should probably sign-off on that chummy note and resist my curmudgeon-like urge to kvetch (especially on the eve of teaching evaluations ;-), but I can't.

Despite the semester-long attempts to foster skepticism, there still was a little too much  google-swooning in the reviews for my taste.  While I don't mean to legislate your predilections, I do want to suggest that it would be way much more fun to be path-breakers rather than be groupies.  For the  former you would need  more skepticism and a lot more intellectual swagger.
No one ever changed/improved  anything that they are smitten with.

cheers
Rao



Monday, December 8, 2008

Fwd: CEAS teaching evaluations..

Dear all:

 As per the below, I encourage you to take part in the CEAS teaching evaluations.
I take the feedback seriously and particularly  pay attention to written comments on what worked and didn't.

Here is hoping for a 110% turnout ;-)

cheers
Rao


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: James Collofello <JAMES.COLLOFELLO@asu.edu>
Date: Mon, Dec 1, 2008 at 12:09 PM
Subject:
To: "DL.WG.CEAS.Faculty" <DL.WG.CEAS.Faculty@mainex1.asu.edu>
Cc: Ann Zell <ann.zell@asu.edu>


Colleagues,

 

The Fall 2008 teaching evaluations became available to students today, Monday, Dec 1, around 10:00 a.m. and will close on Wednesday, Dec 10 (reading day) at 12:00 midnight.  Students will be able to access the evaluation tool at: https://fultonapps.asu.edu/eval

Please encourage your students to complete the evaluations or face several nagging email requests.  Good luck on your scores!

 

Chairs – please distribute this message to your faculty associates.

 

Thanks,

 

jim

 

James S. Collofello

Associate Dean of Academic and Student Affairs

Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering

Arizona State University

 


Re: question about hw q3

Sorry for the confusion. You can (and should) have room information in the mediator schema.

[I didn't specifically mean to require that mediator schema not have room attribute (it would seem rather silly to have a course schema that doesn't give room information). ]

rao


On Mon, Dec 8, 2008 at 9:31 AM, Mijung Kim <Mijung.Kim.1@asu.edu> wrote:
Hi Professor,

I have a question regarding hw q3.

In the question,

"We have another source called ASU-CS-S02-Catalog- which exports the set of CS courses being taught in Spring 2003, the instructor who will be teaching them, and the rooms in which the classes will be taught. Write this source too as a materialized view on the mediator schema."

According to the mediator schema, we don't have "room" attribute. In this case, should we update mediator schema adding the room to it?

Could you enlighten me on this??

Thanks,

Mijung





Saturday, December 6, 2008

participation evaluation sheet (please return in hardcopy on Tuesday)

Folks:

 I put up a participation self-evaluation sheet at

http://rakaposhi.eas.asu.edu/cse494/participation-08.pdf

Please print it, fill it and bring it to class on Tuesday (I am sending this now rather than just bring it to Tuesday's class since
the form asks you to remember how many classes you missed etc. and I would prefer getting better than order-of-approximation answers).

Rao



Thursday, December 4, 2008

Rescheduled Demo Slots

I forgot to block out the time slots which overlap with Tuesday's class so would the 5 students who signed up during that time please contact me and let me know when you would like to do your demo.

Just to remind everyone, you will only have 20 minutes to complete the demo.  I completed one of the demos earlier today in about 12 minutes.  The demo was very thorough and included some waiting time as well as time to demo several extra credit functions, so 20 minutes should be more than enough time to complete it. 

Keep in mind that if you plan on using one of the lab machines for the demo, that they sometimes take a while to boot/login.

I look forward to seeing everyone's demo next week.


Garrett

The demo signup sheet

Hi Garrett (and the class)

 Here is the demo sign-up sheet with information on who took which slot.

I just noticed that several of those slots are right during the class time on Tue. This is a clear no-no (and I have already black-listed the folks who decided to sign-up for them :-> ). Anyways, please reschedule those to times outside the class time.

thanks
Rao




Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Blog qn for Homework 4 (You should post your answer as a comment to this thread and also enclose it in your hw 4 submission)

Here is the "interactive review" question for homework 4 that I promised.

"List five nontrivial ideas you came to appreciate during the course of this semester"
(You cannot list generic statements like "I thought pagerank was kewl". Here is an example:

The deep connection between feature selection and dimensionality reduction: By
understanding LSI, LDA and MI based feature selection, I was able to see the deep
connections between dimensionality reduction (which works without taking any particular
classification task into account) and feature selection (which typically take the classification task
into account).
)

=============

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Topic for this week: Information Integration --slides available online..

Folks:

 This week we will discuss issues in information integration; tthis will also be the last major topic for the semester.
I put up the slides for the class online. I strongly suggest
that you take a look at them before coming.

cheers
Rao



Sunday, November 30, 2008

Project Demos

There have been a few questions regarding the demos so here's some information you may need.  The demos will each be 20 minutes and will be held between Dec 4th and Dec 9th...a sign up sheet with time slots will be passed around.  Please show up early to the demo so you can be ready to go when your time begins (there are 35 demos so any delays can quickly add up).

For the demo I will ask to see vector space, page rank, auth/hubs, kmeans, and buckshot (or other if you chose something else).  I will ask you to run a few queries, explain some of the algorithmic details of your implementation, and possibly other related things.  Your program should be robust in terms of allowing for configurable parameters (c, w, k, n, etc.).  I will also verify those who implemented a GUI and/or other extra credit items.

Make sure you have your code running smoothly before the demo as each student will only have 20 minutes.  I will hold the demo session in the 2nd floor lab so if you need to run it on one of the lab machines, you should have pleanty of time to setup early.  You may also run it on your personal laptops.

Several students showed up yesterday and today for the additional office hours but for those who couldn't make it, I will have the final office hours on Wednesday before the project submission.

Thanks,
Garrett


Sunday Office Hours

A few of you were interested in meeting today so I will be available from around 2:30pm until at least 4:00pm so feel free to stop by with any questions…

 


Garrett

 

 

Friday, November 28, 2008

Office Hours

I’ll be down in the 2nd floor lab in about 30 minutes for those students who were requesting to meet with me…I’ll also be there on Sunday later in the afternoon…I’ll send out a time by tomorrow.

 

Garrett

 

 

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Shadow-play video of the make-up class online..

Folks:

  A "functional" video of today's class is now online (in the lecture notes page). The video isn't exactly going to win any
cinematography prizes (except perhaps in the shadow-play category), but it is sufficient for you to follow the lectures as well as
identify which specific slides are being shown (the slides themselves are available online).

I would like to once again thank the hardy souls who showed up today *and* waited for close to 30 minutes while I tried to set right all
the things that went wrong in the last minute (those of you who weren't there can commiserate by listening to the first three minutes ;-).

A one-level grade-hike for them would seem entirely warranted...


Happy thanksgiving!
Rao

Additional Sunday Office Hours

If there are students who would find it useful for me to have additional office hours on Sunday later in the afternoon, please let me know and I’ll fix a time to be available.

 


Garrett

 

 

Reminder: Make-up class today at 10:30AM in BY 210 (near advising office)

See you there. We will continue the discussion of Information Extraction

(I decided to modify the coverage a bit--and plan to do a broader overview of information extraction
from unstructured text before going into specific projects like semtag/seeker)

rao

Sunday, November 23, 2008

Re: Doubt in homework

rdf actual standard format would be good; but normal triples are fine as a second choice.

rao


On Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 6:02 PM, Shruti Gaur <sgaur2@asu.edu> wrote:

Hi Dr.Rao

In the question
Write down some of the RDF triples relating the URIs &r12, &r13 and &r14 in form.

Should the triples be in XML or the form(object x, predicate, object y)?
--
Thanks & Regards

Shruti Gaur
Graduate Student
MS(Computer Science)
Dept of Computer Science & Engineering
Arizona State University

Re: HomeWork 4

You have to write an xquery that does this reformatting (and run it and show it does)

Rao


On Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 10:25 AM, Mithila Nagendra <mnagendr@asu.edu> wrote:
Good Morning Dr. Rao

On Homework 4, Question 1 Query 4 - I was wondering if have to produce an output that matches the format given or actually go into the file bib.xml and reformat it.

Thank you
Mithila

Saturday, November 22, 2008

Re: CSE494/598 Project C clarification

Hi Michael (and the rest of the class):

By default, task 6 will be buckshot algorithm as mentioned in the specification.

It is okay to replace task 6 with another task with *similar* complexity (for example, you can replace 6 with bisecting k-means, but not with "small extensions of K-means").
The replacement for task 6 doesn't necessrily have to be a  clustering task.

If you are interested in replacing task 6 with something else, to be on the safe side, you might check with the TA as to whetehr or not the replacement is of similar complexity.

hope this helps.

rao



On Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 11:00 AM, Balzer, Michael J (Mike) <Michael.Balzer@asu.edu> wrote:

Dr. Rao,

When project C was assigned, I thought I remembered you mentioned that you may change Task 6 such that the student may choose what to implement, instead of everyone doing Buckshot.  As it stands now, the class webpage shows Task 6 as Buckshot only, and a list of extra credit tasks.  Another student told me that we are not required to do Buckshot, and can choose something else for Task 6 (e.g. relevance feedback, bisecting k-means, etc.).  Can you clarify?

Thanks,

Mike Balzer


Friday, November 21, 2008

Thinking Cap: From the latest NYT magazine: Netflix prize; Collaborative filtering, Singular value decomposition and recommendation systems

Did you think that NYT can explain SVD and LSI  in its articles?
 Now you can show your parents and friends this article when they ask
what is that strange course you are taking ;-)

The benefits of having NYT work in tandem with the course ;-)

See if you can agree/disagree and/or spot simplistic explanations in the article

Rao

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/23/magazine/23Netflix-t.html

The New York Times
Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By


November 23, 2008
The Screens Issue

If You Liked This, Sure to Love That

THE "NAPOLEON DYNAMITE" problem is driving Len Bertoni crazy. Bertoni is a 51-year-old "semiretired" computer scientist who lives an hour outside Pittsburgh. In the spring of 2007, his sister-in-law e-mailed him an intriguing bit of news: Netflix, the Web-based DVD-rental company, was holding a contest to try to improve Cinematch, its "recommendation engine." The prize: $1 million.

Cinematch is the bit of software embedded in the Netflix Web site that analyzes each customer's movie-viewing habits and recommends other movies that the customer might enjoy. (Did you like the legal thriller "The Firm"? Well, maybe you'd like "Michael Clayton." Or perhaps "A Few Good Men.") The Netflix Prize goes to anyone who can make Cinematch's predictions 10 percent more accurate. One million dollars might sound like an awfully big prize for such a small improvement. But in fact, Netflix's founders tried for years to improve Cinematch, with only incremental results, and they knew that a 10 percent bump would be a challenge for even the most deft programmer. They also knew that, as Reed Hastings, the chief executive of Netflix, told me recently, "getting to 10 percent would certainly be worth well in excess of $1 million" to the company. The competition was announced in October 2006, and no one has won yet, though 30,000 hackers worldwide are hard at work on the problem. Each day, teams submit their updated solutions to the Netflix Prize Web page, and Netflix instantly calculates how much better than Cinematch they are. (There's even a live "leader board" ranking the top contestants.)

In March 2007, Bertoni decided he wanted to give it a crack. So he downloaded a huge set of data that Netflix put online: an enormous list showing how 480,189 of the company's customers rated 17,770 Netflix movies. When Netflix customers log into their accounts, they can rate any movie from one to five stars, to help "teach" the Netflix system what their preferences are; the average customer has rated around 200 movies, so Netflix has a lot of information about what its customers like and don't like. (The data set doesn't include any personal information — names, ages, location and gender have been stripped out.) So Bertoni began looking for patterns that would predict customer behavior — specifically, an algorithm that would guess correctly the number of stars a given user would apply to a given movie. A year and a half later, Bertoni is still going, often spending 20 hours a week working on it in his home office. His two children — 12 and 13 years old — sometimes sit and brainstorm with him. "They're very good with mathematics and algebra," he told me, chuckling. "And they think of interesting questions about your movie-watching behavior." For example, one day the kids wondered about sequels: would a Netflix user who liked the first two "Matrix" movies be just as likely to enjoy the third one, even though it was widely considered to be pretty dreadful?

Each time he or his kids think of a new approach, Bertoni writes a computer program to test it. Each new algorithm takes on average three or four hours to churn through the data on the family's "quad core" Gateway computer. Bertoni's results have gradually improved. When I last spoke to him, he was at No. 8 on the leader board; his program was 8.8 percent better than Cinematch. The top team was at 9.44 percent. Bertoni said he thought he was within striking distance of victory.

But his progress had slowed to a crawl. The more Bertoni improved upon Netflix, the harder it became to move his number forward. This wasn't just his problem, though; the other competitors say that their progress is stalling, too, as they edge toward 10 percent. Why?

Bertoni says it's partly because of "Napoleon Dynamite," an indie comedy from 2004 that achieved cult status and went on to become extremely popular on Netflix. It is, Bertoni and others have discovered, maddeningly hard to determine how much people will like it. When Bertoni runs his algorithms on regular hits like "Lethal Weapon" or "Miss Congeniality" and tries to predict how any given Netflix user will rate them, he's usually within eight-tenths of a star. But with films like "Napoleon Dynamite," he's off by an average of 1.2 stars.

The reason, Bertoni says, is that "Napoleon Dynamite" is very weird and very polarizing. It contains a lot of arch, ironic humor, including a famously kooky dance performed by the titular teenage character to help his hapless friend win a student-council election. It's the type of quirky entertainment that tends to be either loved or despised. The movie has been rated more than two million times in the Netflix database, and the ratings are disproportionately one or five stars.

Worse, close friends who normally share similar film aesthetics often heatedly disagree about whether "Napoleon Dynamite" is a masterpiece or an annoying bit of hipster self-indulgence. When Bertoni saw the movie himself with a group of friends, they argued for hours over it. "Half of them loved it, and half of them hated it," he told me. "And they couldn't really say why. It's just a difficult movie."

Mathematically speaking, "Napoleon Dynamite" is a very significant problem for the Netflix Prize. Amazingly, Bertoni has deduced that this single movie is causing 15 percent of his remaining error rate; or to put it another way, if Bertoni could anticipate whether you'd like "Napoleon Dynamite" as accurately as he can for other movies, this feat alone would bring him 15 percent of the way to winning the $1 million prize. And while "Napoleon Dynamite" is the worst culprit, it isn't the only troublemaker. A small subset of other titles have caused almost as much bedevilment among the Netflix Prize competitors. When Bertoni showed me a list of his 25 most-difficult-to-predict movies, I noticed they were all similar in some way to "Napoleon Dynamite" — culturally or politically polarizing and hard to classify, including "I Heart Huckabees," "Lost in Translation," "Fahrenheit 9/11," "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," "Kill Bill: Volume 1" and "Sideways."

So this is the question that gently haunts the Netflix competition, as well as the recommendation engines used by other online stores like Amazon and iTunes. Just how predictable is human taste, anyway? And if we can't understand our own preferences, can computers really be any better at it?

IT USED TO BE THAT if you wanted to buy a book, rent a movie or shop for some music, you had to rely on flesh-and-blood judgment — yours, or that of someone you trusted. You'd go to your local store and look for new stuff, or you might just wander the aisles in what librarians call a stack search, to see if anything jumped out at you. You might check out newspaper reviews or consult your friends; if you were lucky, your local video store employed one of those young cinĂ©astes who could size you up in a glance and suggest something suitable.

The advent of online retailing completely upended this cultural and economic ecosystem. First of all, shopping over the Web is not a social experience; there are no clever clerks to ask for advice. What's more, because they have no real space constraints, online stores like Amazon or iTunes can stock millions of titles, making a stack search essentially impossible. This creates the classic problem of choice: how do you decide among an effectively infinite number of options?

But Web sites have this significant advantage over brick-and-mortar stores: They can track everything their customers do. Every page you visit, every purchase you make, every item you rate — it is all recorded. In the early '90s, scientists working in the field of "machine learning" realized that this enormous trove of data could be used to analyze patterns in people's taste. In 1994, Pattie Maes, an M.I.T. professor, created one of the first recommendation engines by setting up a Web site where people listed songs and bands they liked. Her computer algorithm performed what's known as collaborative filtering. It would take a song you rated highly, find other people who had also rated it highly and then suggest you try a song that those people also said they liked.

"We had this realization that if we gathered together a really large group of people, like thousands or millions, they could help one another find things, because you can find patterns in what they like," Maes told me recently. "It's not necessarily the one, single smart critic that is going to find something for you, like, 'Go see this movie, go listen to this band!' "

In one sense, collaborative filtering is less personalized than a store clerk. The clerk, in theory anyway, knows a lot about you, like your age and profession and what sort of things you enjoy; she can even read your current mood. (Are you feeling lousy? Maybe it's not the day for "Apocalypse Now.") A collaborative-filtering program, in contrast, knows very little about you — only what you've bought at a Web site and whether you rated it highly or not. But the computer has numbers on its side. It may know only a little bit about you, but it also knows a little bit about a huge number of other people. This lets it detect patterns we often cannot see on our own. For example, Maes's music-recommendation system discovered that people who like classical music also like the Beatles. It is an epiphany that perhaps make sense when you think about it for a second, but it isn't immediately obvious.

Soon after Maes's work made its debut, online stores quickly understood the value of having a recommendation system, and today most Web sites selling entertainment products have one. Most of them use some variant of collaborative filtering — like Amazon's "Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought" function. Some setups ask you to actively rate products, as Netflix does. But others also rely on passive information. They keep track of your everyday behavior, looking for clues to your preferences. (For example, many music-recommendation engines — like the Genius feature on Apple's iTunes, Microsoft's Mixview music recommender or the Audioscrobbler program at Last.fm — can register every time you listen to a song on your computer or MP3 player.) And a few rare services actually pay people to evaluate products; the Pandora music-streaming service has 50 employees who listen to songs and tag them with descriptors — "upbeat," "minor key," "prominent vocal harmonies."

Netflix came late to the party. The company opened for business in 1997, but for the first three years it offered no recommendations. This wasn't such a big problem when Netflix stocked only 1,000 titles or so, because customers could sift through those pretty quickly. But Netflix grew, and today, it stocks more than 100,000 movies. "I think that once you get beyond 1,000 choices, a recommendation system becomes critical," Hastings, the Netflix C.E.O., told me. "People have limited cognitive time they want to spend on picking a movie."

Cinematch was introduced in 2000, but the first version worked poorly — "a mix of insightful and boneheaded recommendations," according to Hastings. His programmers slowly began improving the algorithms. They could tell how much better they were getting by trying to replicate how a customer rated movies in the past. They took the customer's ratings from, say, 2001, and used them to predict their ratings for 2002. Because Netflix actually had those later ratings, it could discern what a "perfect" prediction would look like. Soon, Cinematch reached the point where it could tease out some fairly nuanced — and surprising — connections. For example, it found that people who enjoy "The Patriot" also tend to like "Pearl Harbor," which you'd expect, since they're both history-war-action movies; but it also discovered that they like the heartstring-tugging drama "Pay It Forward" and the sci-fi movie "I, Robot."

Cinematch has, in fact, become a video-store roboclerk: its suggestions now drive a surprising 60 percent of Netflix's rentals. It also often steers a customer's attention away from big-grossing hits toward smaller, independent movies. Traditional video stores depend on hits; just-out-of-the-theaters blockbusters account for 80 percent of what they rent. At Netflix, by contrast, 70 percent of what it sends out is from the backlist — older movies or small, independent ones. A good recommendation system, in other words, does not merely help people find new stuff. As Netflix has discovered, it also spurs them to consume more stuff.

For Netflix, this is doubly important. Customers pay a flat monthly rate, generally $16.99 (although cheaper plans are available), to check out as many movies as they want. The problem with this business model is that new members often have a couple of dozen movies in mind that they want to see, but after that they're not sure what to check out next, and their requests slow. And a customer paying $17 a month for only one movie every month or two is at risk of canceling his subscription; the plan makes financial sense, from a user's point of view, only if you rent a lot of movies. (My wife and I once quit Netflix for precisely this reason.) Every time Hastings increases the quality of Cinematch even slightly, it keeps his customers active.

But by 2006, Cinematch's improving performance had plateaued. Netflix's programmers couldn't go any further on their own. They suspected that there was a big breakthrough out there; the science of recommendation systems was booming, and computer scientists were publishing hundreds of papers each year on the subject. At a staff meeting in the summer of 2006, Hastings suggested a radical idea: Why not have a public contest? Netflix's recommendation system was powered by the wisdom of crowds; now it would tap the wisdom of crowds to get better too.

AS HASTINGS HOPED, the contest has galvanized nerds around the world. The Top 10 list for the Netflix Prize currently includes a group of programmers in Austria (who are at No. 2), a trained psychologist and Web consultant in Britain who uses his teenage daughter to perform his calculus (No. 9), a lone Ph.D. candidate in Boston who calls himself My Brain and His Chain (a reference to a Ben Folds song; he's at No. 6) and Pragmatic Theory — two French-Canadian guys in Montreal (No. 3). Nearly every team is working on the prize in its spare time. In October, when I dropped by the house of Martin Chabbert, a 32-year-old member of the Pragmatic Theory duo, it was only 8:30 at night, but we had to whisper: his four children, including a 2-month-old baby, had just gone to bed upstairs. In his small dining room, a laptop sat open next to children's books like "Les Robots: Au Service de L'homme" and a "Star Wars" picture book in French.

"This is where I do everything," Chabbert said. "After the kids are asleep and I've packed the lunches for school, I come down at 9 in the evening and work until 11 or 12. It was very exciting in the beginning!" He laughed. "It still is, but with the baby now, going to bed at midnight is not a good idea."

Pragmatic Theory formed last spring, when Chabbert's longtime friend Martin Piotte — a 43-year-old electrical and computer engineer — heard about the Netflix Prize. Like many of the amateurs trying to win the $1 million, they had no relevant expertise. ("Absolutely no background in statistics that was useful," Piotte told me ruefully. "Two guys, absolutely no clue.") But they soon discovered that the Netflix competition is a fairly collegial affair. The company hosts a discussion board devoted to the prize, and competitors frequently help one another out — discussing algorithms they've tried and publicly brainstorming new ways to improve their work, sometimes even posting reams of computer code for anyone to use. When someone makes a breakthrough, pretty soon every other team is aware of it and starts using it, too. Piotte and Chabbert soon learned the major mathematical tricks that had propelled the leading teams into the Top 10.

The first major breakthrough came less than a month into the competition. A team named Simon Funk vaulted from nowhere into the No. 4 position, improving upon Cinematch by 3.88 percent in one fell swoop. Its secret was a mathematical technique called singular value decomposition. It isn't new; mathematicians have used it for years to make sense of prodigious chunks of information. But Netflix never thought to try it on movies.

Singular value decomposition works by uncovering "factors" that Netflix customers like or don't like. Say, for example, that "Sleepless in Seattle" has been rated by 200,000 Netflix users. In one sense, this is just a huge list of numbers — user No. 452 gave it two stars; No. 985 gave it five stars; and so on. But you could also think of those ratings as individual reactions to various aspects of the movie. "Sleepless in Seattle" is a "chick flick," a comedy, a star vehicle for Tom Hanks; each customer is reacting to how much — or how little — he or she likes "chick flicks," comedies and Tom Hanks. Singular value decomposition takes the mass of Netflix data — 17,770 movies, ratings by 480,189 users — and automatically sorts the films. The programmers do not actively tell the computer what to look for; they just run the algorithm until it groups together movies that share qualities with predictive value.

Sometimes when you look at the clusters of movies, you can deduce the connections. Chabbert showed me one list: at the top were "Sleepless in Seattle," "Steel Magnolias" and "Pretty Woman," while at the bottom were "Star Trek" movies. Clearly, the computer recognized some factor that suggests that someone who likes the romantic aspect of "Pretty Woman" will probably like "Sleepless in Seattle" and dislike "Star Trek." Chabbert showed me another cluster: this time DVD collections of the TV show "Friends" all clustered at the top of the list, while action movies like "Reindeer Games" and thrillers like "Hannibal" clustered at the bottom. Most likely, the computer had selected for "comic" content here. Other lists appear to group movies based on whether they lean strongly to the ideological right or left.

As programmers extract more and more values, it becomes possible to draw exceedingly sophisticated correlations among movies and hence to offer incredibly nuanced recommendations. "We're teasing out very subtle human behaviors," said Chris Volinsky, a scientist with AT&T in New Jersey who is one of the most successful Netflix contestants; his three-person team held the No. 1 position for more than a year. His team relies, in part, on singular value decomposition. "You can find things like 'People who like action movies, but only if there's a lot of explosions, and not if there's a lot of blood. And maybe they don't like profanity,' " Volinsky told me when we spoke recently. "Or it's like 'I like action movies, but not if they have Keanu Reeves and not if there's a bus involved.' "

MOST OF THE LEADING TEAMS competing for the Netflix Prize now use singular value decomposition. Indeed, given how quickly word of new breakthroughs spreads among the competitors, virtually every team in the Top 10 makes use of similar mathematical ploys. The only thing that separates their scores is how skillfully they tweak their algorithms. The Netflix Prize has come to resemble a drag race in which everyone drives the same car, with only tiny modifications to the fuel injection. Yet those tweaks are crucial. Since the top teams are so close — there is less than a tenth of a percent between each contender — even tiny improvements can boost a team to the top of the charts.

These days, the competitors spend much of their time thinking deeply about the math and psychology behind recommendations. For example, the teams are grappling with the problem that over time, people can change how sternly or leniently they rate movies. Psychological studies show that if you ask someone to rate a movie and then, a month later, ask him to do so again, the rating varies by an average of 0.4 stars. "The question is why," Len Bertoni said to me. "Did you just remember it differently? Did you see something in between? Did something change in your life that made you rethink it?" Some teams deal with this by programming their computers to gradually discount older ratings.

Another common problem is identifying overly punitive raters. If you're a really harsh critic and I'm a much more easygoing one, your two-star rating may be equal to my four-star rating. To compensate, an algorithm might try to detect when a Netflix customer tends to hand out only one- or two-star ratings — a sign of a strict, pursed-lip customer — and artificially boost his or her ratings by a half-star or so. Then there's the problem of movie raters who simply aren't consistent. They might be evenhanded most of the time, but if they log into Netflix when they're in a particularly bad mood, they might impulsively decide to rate a couple of dozen movies harshly.

TV shows, which are hot commodities on Netflix, present yet another perplexing issue. Customers respond to TV series much differently than they do to movies. People who loved the first two seasons of "The Wire" might start getting bored during the third but keep on watching for a while, then stop abruptly. So when should Cinematch stop recommending "The Wire"? When do you tell someone to give up on a TV show?

Interestingly, the Netflix Prize competitors do not know anything about the demographics of the customers whose taste they're trying to predict. The teams sometimes argue on the discussion board about whether their predictions would be better if they knew that customer No. 465 is, for example, a 23-year-old woman in Arizona. Yet most of the leading teams say that personal information is not very useful, because it's too crude. As one team pointed out to me, the fact that I'm a 40-year-old West Village resident is not very predictive. There's little reason to think the other 40-year-old men on my block enjoy the same movies as I do. In contrast, the Netflix data are much more rich in meaning. When I tell Netflix that I think Woody Allen's black comedy "Match Point" deserves three stars but the Joss Whedon sci-fi film "Serenity" is a five-star masterpiece, this reveals quite a lot about my taste. Indeed, Reed Hastings told me that even though Net­flix has a good deal of demographic information about its users, the company does not currently use it much to generate movie recommendations; merely knowing who people are, paradoxically, isn't very predictive of their movie tastes.

As the teams have grown better at predicting human preferences, the more incomprehensible their computer programs have become, even to their creators. Each team has lined up a gantlet of scores of algorithms, each one analyzing a slightly different correlation between movies and users. The upshot is that while the teams are producing ever-more-accurate recommendations, they cannot precisely explain how they're doing this. Chris Volinsky admits that his team's program has become a black box, its internal logic unknowable.

There's a sort of unsettling, alien quality to their computers' results. When the teams examine the ways that singular value decomposition is slotting movies into categories, sometimes it makes sense to them — as when the computer highlights what appears to be some essence of nerdiness in a bunch of sci-fi movies. But many categorizations are now so obscure that they cannot see the reasoning behind them. Possibly the algorithms are finding connections so deep and subconscious that customers themselves wouldn't even recognize them. At one point, Chabbert showed me a list of movies that his algorithm had discovered share some ineffable similarity; it includes a historical movie, "Joan of Arc," a wrestling video, "W.W.E.: SummerSlam 2004," the comedy "It Had to Be You" and a version of Charles Dickens's "Bleak House." For the life of me, I can't figure out what possible connection they have, but Chabbert assures me that this singular value decomposition scored 4 percent higher than Cinematch — so it must be doing something right. As Volinsky surmised, "They're able to tease out all of these things that we would never, ever think of ourselves." The machine may be understanding something about us that we do not understand ourselves.

Yet it's clear that something is still missing. Volinsky's momentum has slowed down significantly, as everyone else's has. There's some X factor in human judgment that the current bunch of algorithms isn't capturing when it comes to movies like "Napoleon Dynamite." And the problem looms large. Bertoni is currently at 8.8 percent; he says that a small group of mainly independent movies represents more than half of the remaining errors in the way of winning the prize. Most teams suspect that continuing to tweak existing algorithms won't be enough to get to 10 percent. They need another breakthrough — some way to digitally replicate the love/hate dynamic that governs hard-to-pigeonhole indie films.

"This last half-percent really is the Mount Everest," Volinsky said. "It's going to take one of these 'aha' moments."

SOME COMPUTER SCIENTISTS think the "Napoleon Dynamite" problem exposes a serious weakness of computers. They cannot anticipate the eccentric ways that real people actually decide to take a chance on a movie.

The Cinematch system, like any recommendation engine, assumes that your taste is static and unchanging. The computer looks at all the movies you've rated in the past, finds the trend and uses that to guide you. But the reality is that our cultural tastes evolve, and they change in part because we interact with others. You hear your friends gushing about "Mad Men," so eventually — even though you have never had any particular interest in early-'60s America — you give it a try. Or you go into the video store and run into a particularly charismatic clerk who persuades you that you really, really have to give "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou" a chance.

As Gavin Potter, a Netflix Prize competitor who lives in Britain and is currently in ninth place, pointed out to me, a computerized recommendation system seeks to find the common threads in millions of people's recommendations, so it inherently avoids extremes. Video-store clerks, on the other hand, are influenced by their own idiosyncrasies. Even if they're considering your taste to make a suitable recommendation, they can't help relying on their own sense of what's good and bad. They'll make more mistakes than the Netflix computers — but they're also more likely to have flashes of inspiration, like pointing you to "Napoleon Dynamite" at just the right moment.

"If you use a computerized system based on ratings, you will tend to get very relevant but safe answers," Potter says. "If you go with the movie-store clerk, you will get more unpredictable but potentially more exciting recommendations."

Another critic of computer recommendations is, oddly enough, Pattie Maes, the M.I.T. professor. She notes that there's something slightly antisocial — "narrow-minded" — about hyperpersonalized recommendation systems. Sure, it's good to have a computer find more of what you already like. But culture isn't experienced in solitude. We also consume shows and movies and music as a way of participating in society. That social need can override the question of whether or not we'll like the movie.

"You don't want to see a movie just because you think it's going to be good," Maes says. "It's also because everyone at school or work is going to be talking about it, and you want to be able to talk about it, too." Maes told me that a while ago she rented a "Sex and the City" DVD from Netflix. She suspected she probably wouldn't really like the show. "But everybody else was constantly talking about it, and I had to know what they were talking about," she says. "So even though I would have been embarrassed if Netflix suggested 'Sex and the City' to me, I'm glad I saw it, because now I get it. I know all the in-jokes."

Maes suspects that in the future, computer-based reasoning will become less important for online retailers than social-networking tools that tap into the social zeitgeist, that let customers see, in Facebook fashion, for example, what their close friends are watching and buying. (Potter has an even more intriguing idea. He says he thinks that a recommendation system could predict cultural microtrends by monitoring news events. His research has found, for example, that people rent more movies about Wall Street when the stock market drops.) In the world of music, there are already several innovative recommendation services that try to analyze buzz — by monitoring blogs for repeated mentions of up-and-coming bands, or by sifting through millions of people's playlists to see if a new band is suddenly getting a lot of attention.

Of course, for a company like Netflix, there's a downside to pushing exciting-but-risky movie recommendations on viewers. If Netflix tries to stretch your taste by recommending more daring movies, it also risks annoying customers. A bad movie recommendation can waste an evening.

Is there any way to find a golden mean? When I put the question to Reed Hastings, the Netflix C.E.O., he told me he suspects that there won't be any simple answer. The company needs better algorithms; it needs breakthrough techniques like singular value decomposition, with the brilliant but inscrutable insights it enables. But Hastings also says he thinks Maes is right, too, and that social-networking tools will become more useful. (Netflix already has one, in fact — an application that lets users see what their family and peers are renting. But Hastings admits it hasn't been as valuable as computerized intelligence; only a very small percentage of rentals are driven by what friends have chosen.) Hastings is even considering hiring cinephiles to watch all 100,000 movies in the Netflix library and write up, by hand, pages of adjectives describing each movie, a cloud of tags that would offer a subjective view of what makes films similar or dissimilar. It might imbue Cinematch with more unpredictable, humanlike intelligence.

"Human beings are very quirky and individualistic, and wonderfully idiosyncratic," Hastings says. "And while I love that about human beings, it makes it hard to figure out what they like."

Clive Thompson, a contributing writer for the magazine, writes frequently about technology.


Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Today's Office Hours

Since several students have expressed interested in talking during today’s office hours, I’ll plan on sitting in the 2nd floor lab rather than on the 5th floor.  I’m also planning to extend the office hours from 3pm – 5pm to make sure all the questions get answered.  If you have questions/concerns about project 3, feel free to stop by.

 

Garrett

 

 

Thinking Cap questions: The Lame-Duck edition

First, a link:

Here is a link to the "Chinese room" argument: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Room

-------------------

Here are some points to ponder on the recent topics:

0 (don't need to answer on blog): We talked a lot about syntax and semantics. Using English as the example, think of (a) whether
an ungrammatical sentence can have semantics (b) a sentence with "no meaning" can be grammatically correct.
Consider the famous example: "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously."  (Check out
http://rakaposhi.eas.asu.edu/f06-cse471-mailarchive/msg00090.html for the history of that sentence...)


1. We talked about the fact that XML is a syntactic standard and doesn;t have semantics. Do relational databases have
semantics?  (And if so, then won't a conversion of a relational database to an XML form preserve those semantics?)

Consider the case of the use of the database by someone who knows and understands the database schema as well as a
lay user that doesn't

[In thinking about semantics, it is useful to think in terms of the "worlds" that are consistent with a data/knowledge base.
You will say that a formal sentence has semantics if you can enumerate worlds where it is going to be true (or alternately,
given a completely specified world, you can tell whether or not that sentence is "true" in that world. As you add more and more
sentences to a knowledge base, you constrain the number of worlds that are consistent with it.]


2. Here is a question that one of the students asked after the class: We said XML can be viewed either as ordered or unordered.
From a DB perspective, we would like to see it as unordered and from an IR perspective we would like to see it as ordered.
The question is what, if any, is the disadvantage of assuming that XML is always ordered? More specifically what is the loss from the
database side if we unilaterally decide that XML is ordered whether or not it was intended in such a way?



Friday, November 14, 2008

Current Cumulatives

Folks:

 To give you an idea of where things stand, and also to catch  any errors in the current grade sheet, I am enclosing a current snapshot.

I combined the project/homework/midterm marks into a cumulative--currently I took midterm to be 20%, homeworks to be 5% each and projects
to be 10% each. Please note that this weighting is subject to change (I have, in the past, computed cumulatives with three or four different
weigtings and taken the maximum of those). Nevertheless, they will give you an approximate idea of your class standing.

Let me know if you have questions.

regards
Rao

ps: The 598 students are listed first and then 494 students (separated from them). Each list is sorted in the descending order of cumulative.
      The "percentage" column shows the current percentage (i.e.  your current total out of 50, extrapolated to 100).

Emacs!

Thursday, November 13, 2008

Farenheit 451 and other references from today's class...

Folks
 Sorry--I mis-spoke re: the title of Ray Bradbury's book. It is Farenheit 451-- (451 being the temperature where paper burns).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit_451

Also, we are finally coming to the part of the course that actually intersects with research done in my group (which also means I am likely to be
less objective--caveat emptor..).

Relevant publications from my group can be found at http://rakaposhi.eas.asu.edu/i3/

cheers
Rao

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Re: NBC question

Probability of example--yes--that can be ignored. Just show k*what you got

Rao

ps:

[Notice that it is not all that hard to compute it too.

Suppose you are computing P(C|E)    and you write it as k*0.33
Now, suppose you also compute P(~C|E)  (where ~C means it is not in class C)-- this too will have P(E) in the denominator and so it too will have the same k factor. Suppose it is k*0.44

now, you know that P(C|E) + P(~C|E) will be 1.0.

So k*0.33+k*0.44 = 1
k = 1/0.77



On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 2:43 PM, Balzer, Michael J (Mike) <Michael.Balzer@asu.edu> wrote:

Hi Dr. Rao,

Regarding P(E), or, P(D) in NBC, just wanted to clarify – since this is a common factor, then it can be safely ignored, correct?  In your example slide (willwait), I think you show this as "k" in the calculation.  In the homework, do we just show this as k in the final answer?

Thanks again,

Mike Balzer


Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Re: Doubt about Q3 of homework 3

You use the same distance/similarity measure as in Qn 2.

Rao


On Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 5:06 PM, Durga Bidaye <dbidaye@asu.edu> wrote:
Hello Prof Rao

I have a doubt about Q3 of Homework 3. In Q3, we are supposed to do agglomerative clustering on documents given in the previous question. Also, for inter-cluster similarity, we are supposed to use single link distance. However, nothing has been specified about the similarity measure to be used for finding the similarity(distance) between the individual documents themselves. Are we supposed to use the same measure as the previous question ie. 'Bag based similarity' or we are supposed to use something else. Thank you.

Regards
Durga

Re: Doubt Q2

Yes, taking (1-sim(c,d)) would be a fine way to convert similarity into distance (assuming of course that the similarity is between 0 and 1).

Rao


On Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 7:25 PM, suganthi cidambaram <Suganthi.Cidambaram@asu.edu> wrote:
Dear Dr. Rao
 
Question2 asks us to find cluster dissimilarity measure ( which is defined as the sum of similarities of docs from their resp. cluster centers). But here we are using Jaccard similarity, so was wondering how would the sum of similarity give the dissimilarity. Summation seems to make sense for Euclidean Dist.
 
So should I be doing summation of (1-sim(c,d)) when using Jaccard Sim.
 
Thank You.
 
Regards
Suganthi
 
 
 
 


Thursday, November 6, 2008

homework 3 assigned; due next thursday Nov 13th

Folks:
 
 I posted homework 3--with five questions. The homework is due in class next Thursday (it is a "traditional" homework in that I posted all questions at once).

To give you a heads-up, there will be one more homework before the end of the semester. For this one, I will try to add questions as soon as topics are covered in the class. The last homework will be due before the end of the semester.

Rao

Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Fwd: (this time with 598/494 demarcation shown) midterm grades (marks by posting-id)



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Subbarao Kambhampati <rao@asu.edu>
Date: Wed, Nov 5, 2008 at 12:17 PM
Subject: midterm grades (marks by posting-id)
To: Rao Kambhampati <rao@asu.edu>


Midterm
65pts
Posting ID

[598Section]
31.5 1662 489
34 7309 235
32.5 2863 440
41 9443 694
40 8868 882
49.5 2568 845
57.5 4005 448
26 3902 511
53.5 1483 115
44 5123 179
57 4621 611
28 6760 290
49 2446 400
42 9882 896
46.5 7381 412
47.5 2550 408
46.5 2908 344
27 7712 852
43 6111 673
47.5 3823 434
40.5 5052 059
48 5980 640
58.5 0721 546
42.5 2429 154
31.5 9993 347
54 0819 963
22 8121 455
45 2979 440
30.5 0657 616
48.5 6348 736


54 3397 715

[494section]
27 4119 801
44.5 2816 467
45 6201 263
  2775 346
  9807 132
10 4726 012
52.5 1385 631


2  

Stats All
58.5 max
10 min
41.60 avg
11.23 stddev


Just 598
58.5 max
22 min
42.53 avg
10.06 stddev


just 494
52.5 max
10 min
35.8 avg
17.19 stddev

midterm grades (marks by posting-id)

Midterm
65pts
Posting ID
31.5 1662 489
34 7309 235
32.5 2863 440
41 9443 694
40 8868 882
49.5 2568 845
57.5 4005 448
26 3902 511
53.5 1483 115
44 5123 179
57 4621 611
28 6760 290
49 2446 400
42 9882 896
46.5 7381 412
47.5 2550 408
46.5 2908 344
27 7712 852
43 6111 673
47.5 3823 434
40.5 5052 059
48 5980 640
58.5 0721 546
42.5 2429 154
31.5 9993 347
54 0819 963
22 8121 455
45 2979 440
30.5 0657 616
48.5 6348 736
54 3397 715
27 4119 801
44.5 2816 467
45 6201 263
  2775 346
  9807 132
10 4726 012
52.5 1385 631


2  

Stats All
58.5 max
10 min
41.60 avg
11.23 stddev


Just 598
58.5 max
22 min
42.53 avg
10.06 stddev


just 494
52.5 max
10 min
35.8 avg
17.19 stddev

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Office Hours Location

Given that the project is due tomorrow there's a chance more students might show up to today's office hours so if you plan to come, I'll be having my office hours in the 2nd floor lab instead of on the fifth floor.

Thanks,
Garrett



Next topic: Text classification (required reading: Chapter 14 of Manning et al's book)

Our next topic is classification techniques. Classification is an enormous area and entire courses are devoted to it.
We will only spend about 1.5 classes on it and get a birds eye view of the main issues, and look at Naive Bayes Classifier--a techniques that works about as well
as a default strategy in text classification as K-means does as a default strategy for clustering.

The classification techniques are also useful in content-based filtering (which will come up in the discussion of recommender systems to start next week).

The reading for tomorrow is chapter 14 of Manning et al's book

rao

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Lost Backpack

I noticed a backpack sitting on the ground in the second floor lab near where I was sitting for office hours.  Did one of you leave your bag by chance?

 

Garrett

 

 

 

Project 2 Fix

It was pointed out that some of the pages in the LinkExtract file have a space at the beginning of their name and therefore might not be matched when provided with the name w/o the space.  Some of you have worked around this but if you are having problems, there are two quick solutions to this problem.

1)  Simply edit the Hashedlinks file replacing ", " with ","  (replace comma followed by space with just a comma)

2)  Edit the LinkExtract.java file and add the following after this line in the constructor sin = sin.substring(sin.indexOf("[")+1,sin.indexOf("]"));

sin = sin.replace(", ", ",").trim();

You can add this line yourself and recompile or you can download the updated file from here (didn't want the java file to get caught by virus checker) 

http://asu.mine.nu/CSE494/LinkExtract.zip



Garrett


Additional Office Hours

Just a reminder that today I'll be holding additional office hours in
the 2nd floor lab. I will be there right after today's class for
those that may have last minute questions regarding the project 2.

Garrett

Monday, October 27, 2008

Additional Office Hours

Several students have expressed interest in meeting tomorrow so I will be holding additional office hours right after the class.  Due to the number of students I’m planning to meet, I’ll be holding the office hours in the 2nd floor lab.  I’ll be answering questions regarding the project and the basic approach/algorithm or other similar issues you may be having.  Please don’t come expecting a lesson in Java or help debugging your code as I want to give priority to those students who are having trouble with the actual approach or who need some clarification regarding the project description.

 

Thanks,

Garrett